Social Protection

Exploring refugee assistance by refugees for refugees. With ESRC funding, ‘The Global Governed? Refugee-Led Protection and Assistance’ explores the ways in which refugees mobilise to provide social protection to other refugees.

The two-year project undertakes multi-sited fieldwork in rural and urban contexts in Kenya and Uganda, drawing upon anthropological, historical, and political economy analysis to examine a range of research questions.

The research explores themes such as 1) whether and how social protection norms change as a result of becoming refugees, 2) refugees’ motives for engaging in social protection, 3) the relationship to international and national actors and funders, 4) the process through which organisations and networks emerge and specialise, and 5) whether and how social protection norms change as a result of becoming refugees.

The research fundamentally challenges the idea that refugees are passive victims, purely relying on international assistance, highlighting the diversity of refugee-led social protection activities. And yet, far from romanticising the ‘local’ it shows the centrality of power in shaping norms and practices of refugee-led social protection.

 

Funder: ESRC

Fieldwork: Kate Pincock; Evan Easton-Calabria